Postdating a check

There is, however, one situation in which a bank can be held liable if they cash a post-dated check too soon.That’s when you notify the bank ahead of time that you've written a post-dated check and they shouldn't cash it until the date you've indicated. You'll need to give the bank a good description of the check, including the check number, the payee and the amount.It's no longer a good defense to say that you placed the amount owing in the mail on the due date.

You could try calling the creditors who assessed the fees and ask them to waive the fee this time. If this is the first time this has happened to you, and if your creditors are feeling generous, they may waive the fees. Ask the creditor to wait until you have the money in your account.Cynthia Myers is the author of numerous novels and her nonfiction work has appeared in publications ranging from "Historic Traveler" to "Texas Highways" to "Medical Practice Management." She has a degree in economics from Sam Houston State University.One of the myths that somehow refuses to go away is the myth that post-dated checks are "illegal." They are not.The law requires you to place the money in the hand of the creditor, and mailing is merely a convenience for which you take your chances.If you’re running a little short of cash before payday, yet you need to pay a bill, you may be tempted to solve the problem by writing your check, but dating it for after the day you get paid – when you know you’ll have money in the bank.

Leave a Reply